Scope for Imagination

I'm wide awake....and unintentionally quoting a Katy Perry song. I'm all ears. Metaphorically. Since it's a website I'm technically mostly eyes.

sadim0uto:

sadim0uto:

Hello!! I’m in need of a HUGE signal boost right now (and maybe a big reporting session) because my best friend is being blackmailed by her ex boyfriend. 

I’m not exactly sure what I’m supposed to put here, but I feel like this should be a warning for anyone who knows him and just a general informative thing. Jacob lives in Australia and is 16 years of age. They’ve had a very unhealthy relationship and he’s threatened sending out her nudes multiple times. Jacob is very manipulative and emotionally abusive towards her and even ends up pulling me and her other friends into not being able to do anything because it’ll end up hurting her. He’s made around 7 Twitter accounts to contact my friend in the times that she was trying to get out of the relationship.

In the picture above, he’s posted her nudes and threatened her.

ALL IM ASKING IS FOR YOU TO REPORT HIM ON EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING:

His Twitter accounts all start with @/neinthousand but the one that was most recently used was: @/neinthousand12 (but it was apparently deleted)

His Facebook account is:Jacob R Hynes, and he has more but I am unable to find them. They’re under Jacob Hynes and the like.

********** UPDATES!!! **********

First, we thought we had a compromise. 

Then this happened not even a minute after:

PLEASE CONTINUE REBLOGGING THIS. My friend is only 15 years of age and this is absolutely horrible. We’re getting ahold of local authorities but if you see the pictures anywhere (namely twitter) REPORT THEM IMMEDIATELY.

(via staceyfield)

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.
Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.
The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.
By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.

Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.

The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.

By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

(via timeturner)

briannacherrygarcia:

"The Moon and Stars" inspired by one of my favorite artists, Alphonse Mucha.
This piece will be up for sale on TeeFury on September 21 (this Sunday!) and will be available for only 24 hours.

briannacherrygarcia:

"The Moon and Stars" inspired by one of my favorite artists, Alphonse Mucha.

This piece will be up for sale on TeeFury on September 21 (this Sunday!) and will be available for only 24 hours.

Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgement that
something else is more important than fear.

—Ambrose Redmoon (via hqlines)


(via ewchihasush)

saucywenchwritingblog:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 
There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

saucywenchwritingblog:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 

There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)